New Acquisition

This is a Hano Mana kachina doll. I posted a while back on some Zuni kachina rock art and the role that kachinas play in Pueblo religion.

The place where I bought this had it misidentified, but the artist’s inscription on the base that identified him as Hopi-Tewa helped me figure it out with a little research. It also opened up an interesting historical story.The Hopi are a Puebloan tribe that lives in a series of villages on the three Hopi Mesas (called First, Second and Third Mesas) in northeastern Arizona. They speak a Uto-Aztecan language and have evidently been living in the area for thousands of years.After the collapse of the Second Pueblo Revolt against the Spanish in 1696, a village of Tewa people, another Puebloan group that speaks a Tanoan language, left the Galisteo Basin in northern New Mexico and migrated west, presumably to avoid the Spanish. The exact details of this journey aren’t clear but by about 1700, the Hopi allowed the Tewa to build a village on First Mesa, a couple of hundred miles away from their starting point. The Tewa soon proved their worth by defeating a raiding party of Utes and have been there ever since. The Tewa village is known as Hano and much later in the 19th century they established a second village at the base of First Mesa named Polacca. The Hopi-Tewa still speak their language that is unrelated and mutually unintelligible to Hopi. They also all speak Hopi, but no Hopi speak Tewa, which has been the subject of a good deal of anthropological research.The Hopi-Tewa have their own religious beliefs that are similar to but distinct from those of the Hopi. The two groups do cooperate in a number of rituals. This Hano Mana kachina is a Hopi-Tewa one, known in English as the Hano Long-haired Kachina Maiden.

Some Original Educational Advice

From Father Joseph Rutler via The Corner.

“…I’d encourage your youngest one to abandon kindergarten altogether. Almost everything I learned was learned outside the classroom, and school itself interrupted my education. Moreover, school locks you in with your peers. That is a mistake. One’s social circle should never include one’s equals. From my earliest years I found children uninteresting and always preferred the company of adults. This was an advantage, because I got to know lots of folks who are dead now whom I never would have known if I had waited until I was an adult. – So I have a collective memory – and oral tradition – that goes back to the eighteenth century, having spoken with people who knew people who knew people who knew people who lived then. – The only real university is the universe and a city its microcosm. That is why an expression like “New York University” is foolish. New York City is the university….Instead of school, children should spend some hours each day in hotel lobbies talking to the guests. They should spend time in restaurant kitchens and shops and garages of all kinds, learning from people who actually make the world work….One day spent roaming through a real classical church building would be the equivalent of one academic term in any of our schools, and a little time spent inconspicuously in a police station would be more informative than all the hours wasted on bogus social sciences. Formal lessons would only be required for accuracy in spelling and proficiency in public speaking, for which the public speakers in our culture are not models, and in exchange for performing some menial services a child could learn the violin, harp, and piano from musicians in one of the better cocktail lounges, or from performers in the public subways….So I urge you to keep your child out of kindergarten, because kindergarten will only lead to first grade and then the grim sequence of grade after grade begins and takes its inexorable toll on the mind born fertile but gradually numbed by the pedants who impose on the captive child the flotsam of their own infecundity.”

I read somewhere else recently that those who can already read in Kindergarten are viewed with suspicion by the educational establishment as they undercut the need for the system. I could read at “grade 8 level” then, thanks to my parents, Kipling, Life magazine, and Roger Tory Peterson, so maybe I was already launched on a life of rebellion…

Another thought: his opinions sound remarkably like Betsy Huntington’s. The OLD northeast…

Quote

From Ryszard Kapuscinski’s Travels with Herodotus:

“Man knows, and in the course of years he comes to know it exceedingly well, that memory is weak and fleeting, and if he doesn’t write down what he has learned and experienced, that what he carries within him will perish when he does. That is why it seems everyone wants to write a book. singers and football players, politicians and millionaires.And if they themselves do not know how, or else lack the time, they commission someone else to do it for them. That is how it is and always will be. Engendering this reality is the impression of writing as an easy and simple pursuit, though those who subscribe to that view may do well to ponder Thomas mann’s observation that “a writer is a man for whom writing is more difficult than it is for others.”