The Girls Play

Once again we have a Girls’ Act. Bobo has regressed her great aunt to about 18 months old (from 14 years).  They play and pop and flirt as long as anyone stays awake.

This will come as no surprise to anyone who knows Turcoman tazis.
Ataika’s mother was 14 when she had her and 21 when she died, Her
grandmother attained 19, If she were at “home” she would probably sill
be jumping off the backs of camels.

Almaty- Taik on left just two months younger than Bo            

Be patient — real content is coming.

By the way — does anyone have any trouble seeing the usual background for this blog? At this point we’re just seeing white space down here…

Bobo

Yes, we have the new pup, and she is everything we wanted. Even ATAIKA likes her- perhaps she can smell familiar genes. (She is her great aunt). Of course she shreds everything, but she wouldn’t be a tazi if she didn’t…

Thanks to Lane Batot, and especially to Philip Bailey and Kerry Cooper, who kept her an extra month so Libby could heal; and to Stefan Wachs, fast becoming our official photographer, for the baby pics.

Don’t blame Stefan for my pallor on this one- I tweaked his to show the grain on the Coggswell.

Isabella’s pups

..In Virginia- 5 boys,  5 girls:

0ur pick is the small brown- collared girl, who has a white blaze and the prospect of a dark muzzle and ears. She might resemble the late lamented Pax. They, and Ataika, are all closely related. Our current thought on a name is Alema, Kazakh for Milky Way, after Lauren’s Kazakh eagle.

 Pax.

Alema

Healthy Dogs

Both Reid and Matt reviewed Ted Kerasote’s first dog book, Merle’s Door, here. His newest book, Pukka’s Promise:the Quest for longer- Lived Dogs, nearly got by me as I worked on my own dog book, and that would be a shame. Less a narrative than his previous book, it uses his present dog Pukka to examine all the odd modern attitudes to dogs that hamper our efforts to breed and live with healthy animals. Without being an exact parallel to Hounds of Heaven, it nevertheless is concerned with many of its issues: how to breed healthy dogs, how to feed them, how to let them lead good lives. He deals with everything from genetic diversity to cancer.

I  was intensely interested in his chapter on, and against, spaying and neutering. Even for stopping population growth, he argues, vasectomies and tubal ligation, which can be cheaper, are superior methods– dogs with intact organs are less likely to stress their adrenal glands, have fewer cancers, and are generally healthier. He puts a little less emphasis on genetic diversity and its loss, my chief worry, but he catches the cultish spirit behind universal spay neuter. Many people are actively hostile to him when they realize his dog is “intact”; one asks him “Don’t all dogs have to be spayed and neutered?”

“Why?” I replied.

“For their health”.

“Where did you hear that?’

“From my vet.” !!!!

It seems even with the struggles and arguments I have had, I have been living in a bubble.Kerasote goes on to state:”Intact dogs have almost vanished from ordinary family life during the last four decades and can now only be seen on a regular basis at dog shows and field trials, in some inner-city neighborhoods, and on Indian reservations. [emphasis mine SB] This is not a representative sample of dogdom, either behaviorally or genetically. But when I’ve remarked to people in the animal welfare movement that we need to be concerned about the narrowing of the canid gene pool, and its consequences for the health of dogs as well as our understanding of them, I’ve been called an egghead. As one person told me, “I can’t get exercised over long-term genetics effects when millions of dogs are dying in shelters.'”

If you want to have dogs, never mind healthy dogs, you had better think about this! Here are a few amusing links. Which dog breeds are closely related to wolves?” will remind you that Asian sighthounds are not greyhounds. Pedigree Dogs Exposed is a continuing expose of what limited gene pools do to animals. And “33 Healthiest dog breeds” was getting me angrier and angrier as it counted down, until I got to the last– and laughed aloud.

Some healthy dogs we know: