Tumbling Tumbleweeds

What drought and an invasive Asian exotic can do in a hard winter– all this and zero at night, at Lee Henderson’s where we chase things- photos from Lee. That is his house on the right in the third pic; in the first, that fencerow is likely higher than your head. Ranching for a living, like old age, is not for sissies.

6 thoughts on “Tumbling Tumbleweeds”

  1. I once drove out to the Sand Creek Massacre site, out in far eastern Colorado. I then headed north, hitting US40 at Cheyenne Wells and heading west again. Though the morning had been clear, by afternoon I could see off to the west that weather was brewing over the mountains and heading east. By the time I got to Wild Horse it was starting to look stormy, and was very windy. I turned onto Hwy 94 at Aroya, and crested the hill overlooking the plains, back toward the mtns. The view was amazing, it looked like I was at the edge of the ocean. The entirety of the plains, as far as the eye could see, looked like waves, everything in constant motion. It was biblical. I then went aways down the hill onto the edge of the plain, and discovered that the ocean was of tumbleweeds, and the whole dang thing was MOVING. And I drove into it. LOL It was awful! I felt like I was in a bad sci fi movie, conflating tumbleweeds with triffids. I did finally make it out the far side, but I had tumbleweeds stuck in the grill, and under the car being dragged on the pavement. Horrible sound.

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  2. That's a goodly pile; out here in Kansas we often find roads drifted shut with tumbleweeds. A few years ago a fella out hunting thought he could make it through and got stuck, then lit the place on fire with a hot tailpipe. He got out, but lost his truck and several guns, and the ammo explosions lasted quite a while!

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  3. Gerry and I once ran into a tumbleweed blizzard while hunting sharp-tails in far eastern WY. The wind was blowing about 40 mph and we hunted into the wind between rows of old Russian Olives. The tumbleweeds would come in waves – and the dogs would take off chasing the tumble weeds until we could get them to hear a whistle through the gale. Amazingly, we did kill a couple of birds that day. When we got back to the truck it was completely buried.

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  4. Gerry and I once ran into a tumbleweed blizzard while hunting sharp-tails in far eastern WY. The wind was blowing about 40 mph and we hunted into the wind between rows of old Russian Olives. The tumbleweeds would come in waves – and the dogs would take off chasing the tumble weeds until we could get them to hear a whistle through the gale. Amazingly, we did kill a couple of birds that day. When we got back to the truck it was completely buried.

    Reply

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